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Let us Ever Walk With Jesus! Walking with Jesus means Our faith grows! A sermon on Luke 17:1-10

Let us Ever Walk With Jesus!
Walking with Jesus means
Our faith grows!
Luke 17:1-10

In Jesus Name!

May the grace, the mercy and love God the Father and the Lord Jesus Chris show you, enable your dependence on them to grow strong as the Holy Spirit sustains you!

The oddest question (and perhaps craziest?  😊 )

The question the disciples ask in the Gospel reading today must be one of two things.  It must be ignorant, or if not, it is completely, without doubt, insane.

Let me explain the first.  If by “increase our faith” they are asking Jesus to increase their knowledge of the faith as in the doctrines and understanding of religious ordinances, then they are ignorant.

Faith is not our doctrine, faith is not a belief statement, or even all the teachings found in, or taken from scripture. Though we use the word as a noun in these days to describe what people believe doctrinally, it wasn’t so then. So if they were asking God to increase their knowledge of doctrine, of theology, then their question was simply ignorant.

But faith means to trust and depend on something or someone. Let’s say I decided during the week that there was too much dust on the lights up there. So, I decided to clean them myself. I would need to have faith in the ladder’s ability to hold me up, I would depend on it, and that the warning that it can only support 225 pounds was somehow… wrong.

So for the disciples to ask Jesus to increase their faith, what they are really asking is, “Lord, give us the opportunities to depend on You and nothing else”  Or to put it another way, “Lord, get rid of all the things that we can’t depend on in our life, so that we only depend on you!”

Any ideas of what you are asking God to take away there?

Any one ready to pray that? 

The challenges of Faith  – Sin in its various forms

If we look at why the disciples ask the question, you see there in the gospel the conversation that occurs before the question, and you see it deals with sin. Specifically, it talks about the sin we encourage in others, or passively encourage by not confronting it, by not rebuking it.

Talk about something that requires the greatest level of faith. 

I mean, how easy would it be for Bob to pull me aside and talk to me about my sin?  To confront it, to challenge it, to remind me that he can run with me to God, and it can be forgiven?

Or is it a lot easier for our deacon to simply say, “Well pastor is mostly a good guy, except for being a Pats fan, and he lets me have fun preaching and teaching, so I will just ignore the sins he committed, or the heresy he teaches, after all, he’s a good guy…”

How much faith would he need to depend on God to bring up the sin, and encourage me to seek God’s forgiveness?

And yet to not do so, to allow people to linger in sin, to give into temptation, to remained trap there, is sin for us.

So whether the sin is gossip or unrighteous anger, whether it is using God’s name in vain, or being jealous to the point where it dominates, we need to trust God enough to be the one God uses to start the redemption process, and the wisdom to listen to God as to what is necessary at this point in time.

You see, “rebuking” isn’t going up to people and wagging your finger in their face. It is working for the repentance and redemption that can only come by the power of the Holy Spirit.  It is placing a value on the sin – realizing something has to be done for the person, because of the damage sin will do!

Rebuking them is going to them in love, and caring for them enough to address the issue

The answer – recognizing the Master

So back to the question – how do we increase our faith? 

Jesus answer is, uhm… really?  If you had any…then…. everything is possible.

Not quite the answer I would expect from Him, really.

And then He goes into this parable about the servant and the master.  The Master gives instructions and the servant simply does it. It’s about that nasty word “obedience”. To do what we are supposed to do, because our master is here.

Or as we say it around here, “The Lord is with you!”

This isn’t doing what we are told to do, as Jesus leaves us on our own, it is our responding to His wisdom, to the fact He has responsibility over us, to ensure we get to be with the Father in heaven. It is listening to Him here, and now, hearing His concern for those who get caught in sin, or who are convinced what they are doing is right, because people of God haven’t confronted them.

It’s about faith and trusting and depending on the God who is here.  About talking to Him and hearing His voice.  About realizing His love for us is so complete that He won’t lead us astray.  

Depending on God is easier, when you know He is here, when you know He is in charge, when you realize that our Lord is the one who loves us.  When we realize He will make all things work for our good, even the tough stuff, then we are able to craft what He has called us to do…

Faith is found, not in your will, not in your strength, but in the fact of God’s presence in your life. You can trust Him, He is here, with you… you can depend on Him, He loves you and is working for your best.

Faith isn’t something that is increased, it is simply something realized… I can trust God, because He loves me!  AMEN!

Sermon Series: Let Us Every Walk With Jesus – Are YOU ready?

Let Us ever walk with Jesus!
Are You Ready?

Luke 14:25-35

Jesus, Son, Savior

May the grace and peace of God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ draw you into this journey, knowing He is there with you!

Don’t go it alone!

In my “down time” I am reading an interesting set of books.  The main character is a retired army officer, who has volunteered to work with the British.  It was at the time they are forming the first commando units in World War II, the kind of group the old show Rat Patrol was based upon.  It is interesting because of the 10 rules that Colonel Randal set up for his raiders.

I like a couple -especially the first

Rule 1:  The first rule is there ain’t no rules

Rule 2:  Keep it short and simple

Rule 4:  Right man ( or woman), right job

Rule 6.  It is good to have a plan B

Rule 7:  Expect the unexpected

It was because of rule 7 that the unofficial rule 8 was born – never go out alone.  So whether it was a mission of one of his jeep teams, or his special sea going raiders on motor boats, or missions to drop paratroops or supplies, no jeep, boat or plane every went out alone.

And that is true today for us as well.  We can’t go out into the world on our own, for there is a spiritual battle which will destroy us if we try.

That is why our sermon series for this fall is based on the hymn we are about to sing, Let us ever walk with Jesus.  It is why Sunday School is about Joining Jesus on His mission, and why Wednesday Night will be about seeing who God has revealed Himself to be, because we can’t survive on our own,

God’s honesty…is scary…

That is what the reading from Luke’s gospel talks about this morning, this invitation to be with God on the journey of our lives.  Allowing Him to disciple that and all that He commits to, when God makes a disciple.  That commitment is a 24/7 commitment on God’s part!  He is responsible to

Teach you

Guide you through problems
comforting you

Provide for you

Help you heal

Fix the things you break… including yourself

Those are all the things God will do and more, doing what you need Him to do, what He sees all you need!  And He makes it happen. For those who make the decision and endure it, those who are willing to give up everything,

I always read this passage as God is asking so much of us. To potentially give up family and friends, to consider how much having a relationship with Jesus could cost you.

Part of me wants to say, Lord, that is too much!

How can you expect us to give up everything?

Are you ready to give it all up?

Have you counted the cost?

Rule 7

Remember rule 7?  Expect the unexpected?
That’s what God has done, the unexpected.

You see when Jesus told us to give up everything, when He told us to count the cost before we followed Him, he wasn’t talking hypothetically. He wasn’t fooling around either. That is what He expects, when we

It is not easy walking with Christ throughout life.  It may require great sacrifice, it may result in family not understanding, and even abandoning you. But that is what Jesus himself did, in order to invite you to journey through life, into the afterlife, with Him guiding you, teaching you, comforting you, making sure you get there.

He has saved us. But to do so, Jesus gave up everything in order that we could walk through life with Him.  Philippians 2 is clear, He gave up heaven to come and dwell with us, and to let us put him to death, and that death was on the cross.

He counted the cost as well, knowing that a sinless sacrifice for our sin would need to be paid. He knew the amount of sin we would commit. He knew that he would bear God’s wrath for it all, He knew the anguish, physical, mental, spiritual anguish,

He did the unexpected, he took it all, so we could be His disciples, His friends.

This is why we walk with Him, God loves us this much,  Despite our sin, for He chose to die for us while we were sinning.

He restores us as we confess our sins, forgiving all of it.

He remembers the promises made in our baptism,

He nourishes us at His feast, even as He looks forward as much as we do to the feast that will be our welcome to heaven.

This is God, who gives it all up for you…

Let us ever walk with Him


Get Dressed to… Be Served? A sermon on Luke 12:21-40

Be Dressed to…
Be Served
Luke 12:21-40

Jesus, Son, Savior

May the grace of God our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ strengthen your faith, so that no only are you ready for Christ’s return, but that you wait with great joy and expectation!  AMEN!

Remembering the Long Nights

Reading the gospel, I was taken back nearly forty years, to my second job in 1980, washing dishes and doing all the grunt work, working 10 pm to 6 am – the graveyard shift.

Those nights were long, and hard at times, but there were some moments, especially as the morning sun light shattered the darkness, that are unforgettable. The peace, the beauty, the relief, I don’t know if I can find the words to explain it.

I think the time we are in, as we await the return of Jesus, is a lot like those dark nights.

As surely as the dawn came to end those nights, so to will our “dark nights” end, as we experience the return of the Son.

The Dark Nights of the Soul
    
Jesus talks a lot about the Kingdom of God, and about the time when it will be seen in all of its glory.  A lot of these conversations, as today’s has Jesus urging us to seek God’s Kingdom and to be ready for the moment our Lord returns.

It’s something we need to take seriously, just as I had to have all the dishes done, and the plates stacked, the maple syrup heated and the vat of coffee ready for the people who would come in the morning, expecting to be served.

But those nights were long and dark.  There was a lot of work to be done. There were times of fear, like when we got robbed, or a man had a grand mal seizure.  There were other times where it was so tempting to fall asleep, because the early morning was so boring and slowwww, and one could get so tired, one might even fall asleep while sitting on the toilet.  Not that I know anyone who would have possibly done that.

But our life, waiting for Jesus to return, is much like that.  We might be distracted by the business, and all the tasks, we might have moments where trauma seems dominant, and anxiety paralyzes us.  Other times, we get so, so tired, and rather than looking to Jesus, we just fall spiritually asleep, unable to pay attention to the promises of God, and His warnings about His return.

I am not talking about actual sleep, but spiritual sleep, the kind of lethargic and eventually unconscious feeling that comes over us, as we stop looking to God, and start falling into temptation, and unaware of God’s grace, we are put into bondage or oppressed by the sin which Hebrews says can so easily trap us.

For nothing will cause us to be unprepared for Jesus return like sin does.  It grabs our attention, it coddles and pleasure us for a moment, and having broken us, leaves us.  We might not consider it all that much, a little lie here, a thought there, and well, that action can’t be as bad a sin as others would make it out to be.  I mean, it didn’t hurt anyone, and other people seem to think it is okay.

And heck, pastor never mentions “that” sin.

Sin is sin, and if you aren’t sure, the simple test is whether it takes your mind off of God, and how would you feel if He came back the moment you said that word, or thought that thought, or were engaged in that deed?  If you don’t like His presence in that moment, you can bet it is a sin… and it will eventually put your soul into a comatose state.

And then what happens if God comes back?

Getting Dressed for..to be served

  It is with that thought Jesus tells us to be dressed and ready to serve, because we don’t know when Jesus is come back.  But when He does, we will be ready to open the door, and greet Him.

But that is where what Jesus says gets interesting.  Seek first Jesus Kingdom, put it above everything else, for Jesus is coming back.  We get that, and if we dare, we might even think about the fact that those who are not ready will be set aside, where they will be judged based on their actions.

But hear again what awaits those who are dressed, and ready to serve.

37 The servants who are ready and waiting for his return will be rewarded. I tell you the truth, he himself will seat them, put on an apron, and serve them as they sit and eat!

This is what is so amazing about our Lord, and the work He gives us, leads not to being slaves, or even servants. But valued guests and friends in the kingdom of God.  He took up our serving apron, and fixes us a feast, rewarding us who are his. 

Even though there were moments in the night where we struggled to get our work done, moments where sin had lulled us to asleep, or the stresses and anxieties of life overburdened us.

In His joy, for at Christ’s return the Father and His greatest desire is fulfilled, for we have been transformed, our hearts and minds by the Holy Spirit.  That is what repentance truly is and being repentant, being transformed we are alert, and care about His coming in the first place.  Not from fear, but looking forward to it with great expectation! 

Until then, in the midst of the night, the Holy Spirit helps us realize the peace of God, which passes all understanding… as Jesus protects our hearts and minds.  AMEN!

Center Stage: The Cross – A sermon on Galatians 6:14-18

Centerstage:
The Cross
Galatians 6:14-18

† Jesus, Son, Savior †

May God’s peace and mercy be upon you, as you live knowing this, you are a new creation, the very people of God

Where do we find contentment?

The Apostle Paul desired that he would never, ever boast in anything except the cross of Christ.

Not in His favorite sports teams

Not in a promotion, or an award given at work

Not in his citizenship or Nationality

Not even in the academic grades or the sports accomplishments of his children or grandchildren.

That makes some sense, even as we know we do those things regularly.  When we look a little deeper at the word behind the word “boast,” the lesson gets a little harder.

The Greek word means to be proud of or to be satisfied and content with your situation or accomplishments. 

Should I go back through that list? 

We find many things that we find contentment, many things in which we find satisfaction.  Paul would have us only find contentment, only find satisfaction when we looked there, at the cross which reminds you that God loves you enough that Christ died… for you!

Nothing is more important in your life than to know God loves you.  Seeing the cross at the center stage of our lives, yet…

The Law – The world rules

That is why Paul talks about the need to see our interest in the world crucified, and the world’s interest in us terminated.  This is hard to comprehend at times, for how do we live in the world and yet, as Jesus tells us, not be of the world?  How can we deal with the family and friends we might lose, the jobs we might have to turn down, all because they do not understand?

It is not easy,

I need to say here we don’t lose them because we annoy them with our condescension, or pretend we are holier or more special that they are.  We better not lose them because we condemn their sin, while ignoring our own.

But the ability to dwell miraculously in peace, and receive God’s mercy will create a difference, and not understanding that is challenging.  As is the change in priorities that occurs when we are transformed by the presence of God in our lives.

The Transformation

You see, God starts transforming us, the moment He claims us in baptism.  We might not even realize the difference He is making, But we become something new, something different, as we experience His love.

We live differently, what the Apostle talks of, to live by this principle, the principle is this: that we are the new people of God.  In Greek, this is the word canon. Not the kind I would like to play with, but canon as in the Biblical Canon.  It means the rule, the form, the standard that we can be measured by. 

Luther talks about something similar when he talks about the third use of the law, that we live in a peace and mercy that affects our life, causing us to live as new creations.

While the world may not understand it, God changes us.  It is why kneeling here is so incredible.  It is why Al when he stood here and baptized his granddaughters was crying for joy.  It is why people, when they hear that they are forgiven, every sin from murder to those little white lies that haunt us, feel as if they were released from the greatest of burdens.  This is the transformation!

It is something the world just can’t understand, this remarkable peace and grace of God which defines us, when we remember that we have been made the children of God.

The Mark How does that happen?  Paul describes it this way, “I bear on my body the scars that show I belong to Jesus.

The stigmata in Greek.  A Reference to the marks, the wounds of Christ.  For it primarily means the mark left by the healing of injured tissue, in a way, a natural tattoo.

But it is deeper than that, because Paul says it is a mark that shows that he belongs to Jesus.  A mark that tells us we are His, that we are united to Him and His death on the cross. We bear that mark of the cross, the stigma of it, for with it we were baptized , marked and sealed, so that not only do we die with Christ.

We live with Him as well.

Which is why I make the sign of the cross during the creed, because of His cross, and our death with Him there, we will rise from the dead and living in the glory of the Father forever! 

And until that day comes, when all men will be judged, the Holy Spirit dwells with us, comforting us, transforming and guiding us, as we live as the new people of God… AMEN!

We MUST Experience God’s Grace…

aren’t we sharing in the blood of Christ? aren’t we sharing in the body of Christ? 1 Cor. 10:16

Devotional Thought of the Day:

5 Now that we have been put right with God through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. 2 He has brought us by faith into this experience of God’s grace, in which we now live. And so we boast of the hope we have of sharing God’s glory! Romans 5:1-2 GNT

To be utterly frank and clear, I would like to say once again: ‘It is fitting that seminarians take part every day in the Eucharistic celebration, in such a way that afterwards they will take up as a rule of their priestly life this daily celebration. They should moreover be trained to consider the Eucharistic celebration as the essential moment of their day, in which they will take an active part and at which they will never be satisfied with a merely habitual attendance. Finally, candidates to the priesthood will be trained to share in the intimate dispositions which the Eucharist fosters: gratitude for heavenly benefits received, because the Eucharist is thanksgiving; an attitude of self-offering which will impel them to unite the offering of themselves to the Eucharistic offering of Christ; charity nourished by a sacrament which is a sign of unity and sharing; the yearning to contemplate and bow in adoration before Christ who is really present under the Eucharistic species.’ (Pastores dabo vobis, 48)

The priestly ministry is a ministry of reconciliation. In the Sacrament of Baptism it leads us, through the admonitions of faith, to a fundamental reconciliation with the living God so that we no longer regard him and his world as a threat, but recognize their foundation in love. It is the priest’s role to make God’s gifts present to us and to associate us with these gifts in such a way that, as the Canon of the Mass puts it, we ourselves become a gift together with him.

For God decided not only that we should believe in the crucified Christ, but that we should also be crucified with him and suffer with him, as he clearly shows in many places in the gospels. “Whoever does not take up the cross and follow me,” says the Lord, “is not worthy of me” [Matt 10:38]. And again, “If they have called the master of the house Beelzebub, how much more will they malign those of his household” (Matt 10:25)! Therefore, each one must carry a piece of the holy cross, and it cannot be otherwise. St. Paul says as well, “In my flesh I am completing what is lacking in Christ’s afflictions” [Col 1:24]. It is as if he were saying that his whole Christianity is not yet completely prepared, and we also must follow so that nothing is lost or lacking from the cross of Christ, but all brought together into one heap. Everyone must ponder that the cross cannot remain external.

There is so much in my readings today, that I am struggling to put it all together!

But it all starts with the Christian life that we have been brought into, what Luther described as living in our baptism, this becoming the gift (In Pope Benedict’s words). One of my professors would have called it living the “Incarnational life” or the “Sacramental life”

It is why we, as a church, need to stop just going through the motions of worship, and why we who are taked with leading have to avoid the trap of manipulating the emotions in the way we plan our services, but simply live in the moment as well.

The challenge is then to let go and live in the liturgy we have, to realize how close it brings us to Christ, how it reveals His love in a way that we experience it, in the way it stimulates and strengthens the hope we have. It is why the seminarian is encouraged to spend as much time as possible contemplating and meditating on the Lord’s Supper, realizing the presence of God, His Body and Blood, that we serve our people, that serves us.

It is this feast, this sacrifice that draws us into Christ’s sacrifice, just as baptism and the other sacraments do, that gives us the faith to trust God as we commune with Jesus as we take up our crosses as well. As we embrace suffering for the hope it gives those around us, as they realize we aren’t just going through the motions, or saying what we think we should say.

For if we realize the love, the mercy and dwell in God’s peace, our people will see it. We won’t just go through the motions of worship, we shall indeed live in it, and the words of the liturgy, drawn from scripture will become alive, not just in us, but in all who participate.

Go back up and read the words again, these words from scripture of the Apostle Paul. See the depth of them, this great encouragement to live in the experience of grace, this being so overwhelmed by the hope of living, knowing we shall share in the glory of God, that we live in the love of the Father, who loves us as much as He loves the Son.

This is why we gather, this is why we savor the words we say and sing in our churches, this is why we study for years to lead the people of God. To help them dwell in the midst of His peace, His presence, His glorious love.

And then, we see something amazing, we become the gift….

Lord, help us to move past the phase of “going through the motions” and then having to manipulate worship. Instead, help us to live in the grace of which we speak, and of which we sing. Help us Father, we pray in the name of Jesus, Who live and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever. AMEN!

Burke, R. L. (2012). Adoration in the Formation and Life of Priests. In A. Reid (Ed.), From Eucharistic Adoration to Evangelization (pp. 136–137). London; New York: Burns & Oates.

Ratzinger, J. (1992). Co-Workers of the Truth: Meditations for Every Day of the Year. (I. Grassl, Ed., M. F. McCarthy & L. Krauth, Trans.) (pp. 191–192). San Francisco: Ignatius Press.

Luther, M. (2007). Sermon at Coburg on Cross and Suffering. In P. D. W. Krey, B. McGinn, & P. D. S. Krey (Eds.), P. D. S. Krey & P. D. W. Krey (Trans.), Luther’s Spirituality (p. 152). New York; Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press.

As Much As! A sermon on John 17 at Concordia

As Much As
John 17:20-26

I.H.S.

May the grace of God our Father and our Lord Jesus Christ help you know this. 
YOU ARE LOVED BY GOD!

Intro – They Don’t Know His Mind toward them.

In Luther’s Large Catechism, there is this sobering thought:

66 These articles of the Creed, therefore, divide and distinguish us Christians from all other people on earth. All who are outside the Christian church, whether heathen, Turks, Jews, or false Christians and hypocrites, even though they believe in and worship only the one, true God, nevertheless do not know what his attitude is toward them. They cannot be confident of his love and blessing. Therefore they remain in eternal wrath and damnation, for they do not have the Lord Christ, and, besides, they are not illuminated and blessed by the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

The Kathos Key

It is a sobering thought, and yet has to do with the gospel reading this morning.  For what the heathens, Turks, Jews and false Christians need to know is what Jesus reveals in today’s gospel reading, the words that give the context to the title, “as much as”.

May they experience such perfect unity that the world will know that you sent me and that you love them as much as you love me


God the Father loves you, as much as He loves Jesus!

As much as, to the very same degree, to an equal measure…

God loves you, just as much as He loves Jesus.

“As much as.”

And this is revealed when we see how much we love, how much we are devoted to, how much we care for one another.

This is the very glory that Jesus shares with us, that we are loved, and it is proven in the unity we have with each other.  A unity that is often not spoken, but it is so…evident.

and proves the love that God has for us.

The Law

When you looked at the apostles, it is truly a miracle that they were of one mind and one heart.  There were men that were enemies, such as Simon the Zealot and Matthew the Tax collector. Seriously, both the lesser Simon and Judas from Iscarioth were rebels, they lived and trained to kill those who work with the Romans.  No one worked closer than the tax collectors, who grew rich off the people.

Or what about the “sons of thunder”, do you really think they got that nickname because they were so gentle and kind towards each other?

Yet, by the power of the Holy Spirit, they become one in mission and one in heart and mind.  The fisherman and the scholar, the enemies, the brothers, and even Peter.  Sounds a lot like us, if it wasn’t for the power of the Holy Spirit at work in us.

When we are so desperate, so overwhelmed we listen to God, and hear how he loves us, that love causes what divides us to drift away.  It doesn’t matter how much hatred we had toward others, how much sin was in our lives, how depraved and evil someone is, when the love of God cuts through to their heart, that love changes everything.

That is how incredible it is that God the Father loves us as much as He loves Jesus.

As God reveals this love, as Christ hangs on the cross, as He is in the grave, as His rises.  The Spirit reveals it to us, as our hearts are cut open, and all that which is broken begins to heal as we are untied to Christ in our baptism, and here at the altar, as we receive His body and blood.

Impact – so that’s!

We see it at work, as we don’t want to stop until we have past God’s peace to every person in the church. We see it as we kneel at the altar together.  I dare say it would be more than awkward to commune next to someone we are pissed off at!  But somehow, as our sins are forgiven together, there is healing of our relationships.

And the world, seeing this, realizes that Christ came for them all. 

For such unity is not natural.

It is Godly though – and people will praise God because of what they see Him doing in us. And that is a witness to the world, just as Jesus prayed it would be.

God has made us one, as He loves us as much as He loves Jesus…..and we will be with God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, for eternity.

And so, along with knowing Jesus asked the Father for this kind of peace, I end with one of the prayers and the words that follow of St Paul,

5  May the God who inspires men to endure, and gives them a Father’s care, give you a mind united towards one another because of your common loyalty to Jesus Christ. And then, as one man, you will sing from the heart the praises of God the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. AMEN!

So open your hearts to one another as Christ has opened his heart to you, and God will be glorified.

Romans 15:5 (Phillips NT)


AMEN!

Who is asking, “Come Stand by Me” A sermon based on Acts 16:9-15

Our worship service and the sermon

Who is Asking,
“Come, Stand by Me”
Acts 16:9-15

† I.H.S.

May the grace and peace of God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ enable you to hear those who cry out for someone to stand by them, even as the Holy Spirit stands with you!

The Vision – Mission Impossible!

A long.. long time ago there was a television show that every week started with a line like this.

“You mission Jim, should you choose to accept it….and then after describing int, ended with, “As always, should you and any of your IM Force be caught or killed, the Secretary will disavow any knowledge of your actions.  This tape will…. (self-destruct in 5 seconds.)

In the reading from Acts this morning, the Apostle Paul gets a similar message.  Not on tape that self-destructs, but in a dream, a vision from God that is so clear, that Paul and his team of missionaries knew it was God calling them to tell the people about God’s love and mercy.

The vision of a man crying out for help, pleading with them, “Come over to us and help us!”

In Greek, that is two simple words, Paraclete – to call alongside to help someone stay standing– and boetheo – a word used to describe a doctor’s rushing to come to the aid of someone mortally wounded. 

I hope we realize that St. Paul isn’t the only one given that mission, to go over and stand by people, to lift them up and help them find healing.

It is our mission, too! 

The Lady

Like the crew on Mission Impossible, which for 49 missions included Captain Spock by the way, Paul and his band of merry missionaries get to their destination.  They look for people who are searching for God, who are searching for hope.

They find someone who deals with the most expensive cloth, who cuts it and sews it.  This is Armani of her day, or Michael Kors, and she dealt with the kind of folk who she dressed up for the ancient Grammy’s or Academy Awards.

Not the kind of person that you would encounter at most small churches, but there she was, praying and hoping for an answer.  Like many people, she tried to worship God, but wasn’t clear who that God was.

As Paul started to share about Jesus, the Holy Spirit opened her heart, and she accepted it, the Greek says she held for dear like to what Paul was saying.

It’s like the story I read of a priest yesterday.  He encountered a young man who was struggling with heroin addiction.  They spent the night in the sanctuary, all night long, thinking about the Lord’s Supper, about the Body broken for this young man.  The priest described him holding onto the altar so tightly he thought he left his nail marks in it. 

And that is the way Lydia received the revelation of God love for her.

Except she wasn’t someone we would normally think of being that “needy”, that desperate, that amazed at finding out something we probably take for granted all too often.

That God loves us.
Oddly enough, Lydia, after Paul baptizes her and all her household (which includes her employees by the way, uses the word Parakaleo when she asks Him to come and stay at her home.

She’s not being hospitable, she realizes she and her household needs continual help to start growing in the faith. There is a sense of desperation in it, as her begging forces them to agree to stay there.

The Church and Apathy about its Mission

How do I know we take our mission for granted? 

How many people do we hear calling for help, whether they are the foreigner trying to adjust to living here, or the homeless guy, or the rich people we don’t think would bother with the likes of us?

How many of them do we hear cry for help and then take the time to respond to their cries for help?

I think we need to realize that not hearing them, not seeing their need is to sin, breaking the second commandment.  For we need to use the Name of God in those situations, sharing with these people in need the love of God, revealing to them His mercy, and His abiding presence. 

The need Him, and we need to remember this mission became our in our baptism, and we take it on every time we greet each other with God’s peace, and when we leave this sanctuary.

No-disavowal here

You know, I always wondered why they called it Mission: Impossible. 

Do you ever remember them failing one of their missions?  Ever?

They just kept solving mission after mission, week after week.

Our real life mission, while a little more difficult, is even more possible.

God doesn’t threaten us by saying He will disavow any knowledge of us, should we fail.

His call to us to go alongside and reveal to people His love and mercy includes His power, as the Holy Spirit empowers our work, and ensures it all works out for good for those who love God, for those He calls according to His purpose, His will.

Sure it may take a while to help some people see His love – but the days and years and decades are worth it. 

For while we are on this mission, Jesus promises He will never abandon us, that He walks with us, that we are united with Him, even as the Holy Spirit comforts us in our failings, as we are cleansed of our sins.
This is our mission.  To share with people.

The Lord is with you!

And that because He is risen,….. (We are risen indeed – and they are part of the “we”)

And therefore, invite all whose lives cry out for someone to Come, stand by them, to enter into the peace of God, the peace you experience, even though it more that you could ever describe, the peace in which you are guarded, heart and mind, by Christ Jesus. 

AMEN!

More Blessed to Give Than Receive

Concordia’s Service on Sunday May 12, 2019
https://youtu.be/R6SQ4TMMvQs

More Blessed to Give than Receive!
Acts 20:17-35

In Jesus Name

May the grace of God our Father and our Lord Jesus Christ so transform your life, that you just don’t know it is better to give than receive, but that you give yourself completely…

Mother’s Day

If there is a day that I don’t have to look far for a sermon illustration, today’s sermon passage from Acts 20 is it. Here is the primary verse for the passage…

“It is more blessed to give than to receive”

and then think

Mother’s Day. 

Hmmm… could there be a connection there? You know, those ladies who have given so much, and whom most of us have benefited from,

Most of us struggle to really understand this passage but if there is a group of people who do, it would be moms!  Been watching a lot of pics on FB this week, of friends whose kids are graduating college.  The largest and perhaps the quietest, proud smiles are on the faces of the moms.  Heck, half the time, they are the ones taking the picture! The same for my cousins, putting up pictures of their sons and daughters at recitals or ball games!  I think they find more joy at the moment than their children do, and the sacrifices, well are forgotten.

Mom’s give a lot, and some of them, when their children succeed, or simply have learned that lesson that was so hard to teach them, find their reward, and know the sacrifice was worth it.

So they have a small grasp on what it means when Paul mentions Jesus’ teaching on “it is more blessed to give than receive.” 

And yet, there is more to it, as we shall see.

The struggle and the answer

The challenge of understanding these simple words is that most of us don’t recognize when someone is sacrificing something in order to help us.  We didn’t see our mom’s at the end of a long day, cleaning the house, or doing the laundry. 

We don’t understand why they would work so hard, or our fathers would work so hard, until we faced the same thing, until we wanted something for our children, for those we care for… then sacrifice became the norm, often without even thinking.

Yet prior to that, we assumed that was our mom’s role.  That is what parents do, they are supposed to wrap their lives around us kids.  They are, along with our grandparents, supposed to spoil us rotten.

And when they disciplined us, we never understood the phrase, “this is going to hurt me more than it hurts you….”

But it did….

Well, I think it did!

But we have to encounter the need to sacrifice out of love, we have to have it happen naturally before we understand it… or at least experience it. It has to get by that part of us that wants to get, get! Get!!

That part of us that is sure what we want is best, that we know what is right, and that throws a tantrum.  What?  You don’t think adults throw tantrums? 

We are quite good at it!

Look at Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or listen to conversations at Starbucks or a bar if you don’t believe me!

Remember, we are called to love.  Love our moms, our spouses, our families, our friends, neighbors and enemies…

That means we can grow in this blessing of giving more than we receive.

Let me give you an example.

Susan, last year when Ethan one of your preschool students ask you to be his sponsor when he got baptized.

Did you think about how much you and your teachers invested in Ethan?  Of the time you taught him about Jesus, or held his hand on the way to chapel? Or were you just in awe of being asked?

That is what it means, that it is better, it is more of a blessing to give than receive!

Context! Context! Context! 

And that brings us back to the context of our passage. 

You see, Paul isn’t talking about being a mom to the leaders of the church in Ephesus. He’s talking about shepherding them, about their need to shepherd the people God entrusts to them…. About our sharing Christ’s love, no matter the cost, with the people God brings us into contact with.

He says this,

24 But my life is worth nothing to me unless I use it for finishing the work assigned me by the Lord Jesus—the work of telling others the Good News about the wonderful grace of God.

Ultimately, that is our job, to help all of “our” kids know that God isn’t going to “get them” when they screw up, but that He wants to fix what they’ve broken.  A relationship, a level of trust, their own internal life. 

Because that is what the cross was about, the ultimate lesson in the idea that it is more blessed to give than receive.

For we received the forgives of sin, and the promise of everlasting life, the ability to know that God will be there for us, with us.

And Jesus gave His life so that God the Father would gain a family of saints.  Including all that depend on Him.

For that is what faith is, realizing how much God has promised, and depending on Him to provide it.  The forgiveness of all sin, the promise of eternal life, and the promise of His walking with us now.. even as we learn to give the gift of salvation to others.

This is what Paul wanted to give everyone the knowledge of, and as he did, as Susan did, as I have done, we realize what it means that it is more blessed to give than receive. 

As we do we realize, as we see it over and over become real to others, that it is in giving that we realize how precious the peace of God is that He draws us into, a peace that goes beyond all understanding, even as, like a mother hen, He protects our hearts and minds in that peace. AMEN!

50,000+ reads, 578 subscribers, 1866 posts, and a thought

This underground church blessed m with great peace…
I pray my blog has helped you experience it over the years.

Devotional Thought of the Day:

37 But some of them said, “He gave sight to the blind man, didn’t he? Could he not have kept Lazarus from dying?” John 11:37 GNT

The third part is the body with its members. Its work is to draw upon and apply what the soul understands and the spirit believes. To use an example from the Bible,17 Moses built a tabernacle with three different courts. The first was the holy of holies; here God dwelt, and in it there was no light. The second was the holy place; here stood a lampstand with seven arms and seven lamps. The third was the outer court; it was open to the sky and to the sun’s light. This is a metaphor for the Christian person, whose spirit is the holy of holies, God’s dwelling in the darkness of faith without light. For the Christian believes what is neither seen, nor felt, nor comprehended. The soul is the holy place with its seven lamps, that is, every form of reason,18 discrimination, knowledge,19 and understanding20 of bodily and visible things. The body is the outer court that is open to everyone, so that everyone can see what one does and how one lives.

First of all, thank you. Thank you for the reads, the comments (especially those) and the time you have taken. Thanks for the patience with my poor typing skills. Thank you mostly for returning to listen, and maybe be drawn closer to God.

This blog actually started in a different place, and has been home here since 2012. It started back when a friend from Washington would ask me for my sermons, and send them out to hundreds of her friends. Another friend once raead a journal entry I made, and declared that I should share it. So “asimplechristian” was born. justifiedandsinner followed a few years after when the host company of the first address couldn’t provide reliable service, then when the address was freed I got it back. It is compromised mostly of sermons and my devotional summaries, with the quotes that give birth to the thoughts.

Lots of thanks to God for those whose writings spawn those thougths. St. Josemaria Escriva, Martin Luther, Pope Benedict XVI, the writers of the Book of Concord and the writings of 2 Vatican Council provide some 80 percent of that.

And here we are, 50,000 reads later (not counting the subscribers who get each post in the mail. (I don’t know if you read it. but you get it!) From over 140 countries.

There is one question I struggle with a lot over the years, and it showed up in the gopsel reading this morning.

Why doens’t God bring about the healing and/or conversion of the ones I love? Why do I have to watch them struggle, knowing that God could take care of them in an instant?

It sounds like the question is about Him, but I think the question is more about me.

You see, I know God is God, and I spend so much time telling people what I know and believe about Him. His mercy, His love, His being there for them, as He rescues them, cleans them up and heals them, comforts them.

Theologians have great canned answers as to why this person is healed and not that one. Why this person responds right away, that one doesn’t, and a third struggles in between. But those answers don’t calm the tears, or ease the broken heart.

That’s when I needed to hear Luther’s explanation this morning, Taken from his explantion of the Magnificat of Mary, found in Luke’s gospel. He uses the illustration of the three holy places, and I get it now.

The outside, which everyone can see, I am a pastor, a strong believer who has been able to depend on God in some crappy situations.

It is the middle section, where i think my reason enters into it, that there is a problem. I get frustrated as I can’t understand it all, I can’t reconcile the glory I see to what appears to be inaction on God’s part. And the dissonance is challenging.

Where I find the resolution is the Holy of Holies, the innder court where God draws me into His presence, with you and a billion others. Luther says there is no light there, but there is something more. There is God, and in His presence there is no need for light. There is awe that overwhelms our intellect, our ability to reason, and as we spend time there, we are conformed to the image of Christ. There we find what it means to adore, to worship God, and there our hearts and minds find the peace and take it back out to the Holy Place, and to the outer court to share with others.

That is where I hope these posts have drawn you, into that Holy of Holies, into the presence of God who longs to dwell in you, and with you.

Thanks for coming- keep going, keep exploring the width and breadth, the height and depth of His love for you, revealed at the cross, in Christ Jesus.

AMEN!

Luther, M. (2007). Luther’s Spirituality. (P. D. W. Krey, B. McGinn, & P. D. S. Krey, Eds., P. D. S. Krey & P. D. W. Krey, Trans.) (p. 99). New York; Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press.


Be Careful What You Ask For… A Lenten Sermon on Luke 13:31-35

https://www.facebook.com/DaPastor/videos/10156216640650878/

Be Careful for What You Ask for…
You might just get it!

Luke 13:31-35

In Jesus Name!

May the grace of God our Father, and our Lord Jesus Christ sustain you in the midst of life, drawing you under His wings, where you can find rest and restoration!

All things? Including a death threat?
God has made many promises in scripture.

One of the promises that is one of the hardest to believe, but also is one of the most amazing is found in Romans 8.  **

And God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according His purpose for them.”

I don’t know about you, but that is a promise that I sometimes struggle with in my life.

From my point of view, looking at the brokenness in my own life, I sometimes wonder whether that promise was made to me.  Because I can’t always see how God can make some of the stuff I’ve done, and some of the things that happen to me work for good, at least my good.

But they do, even as we will see this morning, as we consider the desires of two men, desires that seem to be unlikely to be fulfilled, and one of which, cannot possibly be good, because it calls for someone to die.

But could it?

We shall see….and it is amazing!

Two Men, Two Desires
Herod’s (and Everyman’s desire)


Lets start with Herod first. **

His desire is that Jesus would die.**  The scriptures don’t declare why he wanted Jesus dead, simple that the Pharisees indicated that he did.  These normal adversaries of Jesus are so concerned that they warn Jesus of it.

It’s a case of “the enemy of my enemy must be my friend.” 

**It could be because he feared Jesus was going to haunt him, as John the Baptist did.  Some were even saying Jesus was John returned, a though that would have scared Herod.  After all, Herod was manipulated into killing John, chopping his head off at the request of his daughter and wife.

As the guilt added to his already massive amounts of guilt, the more he would want to get rid of any Godly influence in his life.

**You know that feeling, when you are dealing with guilt and shame, and instead of running to God, you want to run away?  Instead of seeking forgiveness, you try to bury the guilt and shame?  You try to find a way to avoid it, and what better way than killing the person who is God’s messenger?

So Herod’s desire is delayed, and for the moment He can’t get what he has asked for..

Jesus’ Desire

Which leads us to Jesus, who speaks of a desire, the purpose that He is working towards, that he relentlessly pursues. The goal of gathering the people of God together, to ensure their safety, to care for them.

But they won’t let Him.  Just like so many in the world today, including, at times, you and I.

Yet this is Jesus focus, to bring us all into a place where we are cared for, where our souls find peace and healing from the ravages of sin.  The sins of the world, and our own.  For the damage is great, the brokenness that steals away life. Yet that is the life we cling to for some reason.

While Jesus is trying to draw us into a life that is abundant, and free.

How He longed to do that to the people of Jerusalem then, how He longs to lift us up now!

They both got what they wanted

Only God could grant both there desires and work it out so that as they are fulfilled, every one who loves God, everyone called according to His purposes.

Jesus will die as Herod wants, and even as Jesus is lifted up, He will draw all to Himself!

Both desires met. Both would get exactly what they wanted, and more.

You can’t read these chapters in Luke, from the transfiguration to the cross and not know it is coming. Herod couldn’t see that, nor how his desire to be rid of the prophets who confronted his sins would provide the solution to the sin which so easily traps us. He knew the answer to his guilt and shame would be found in the shedding of Jesus’ blood.  But how it was solved, the solution that would cleanse anyone of sin, was beyond His thoughts!

Jesus knows that His death, his being raised from the dead will bring people in, that they will find the forgiveness they need, that they will be able to no longer fear God, but revel in His love.

That is why He is willing to die, to see us be drawn into His death, that we may share in His love. Hear again Paul’s words,

12  For you were buried with Christ when you were baptized. And with him you were raised to new life because you trusted the mighty power of God, who raised Christ from the dead.
Colossians 2:12 (NLT2)

So God made both of these thing, turning the death of Christ, which Herod so wanted, into a blessing beyond imagination as He gathered people together in the cross of Christ.

As He will do with everything in your life, and mine, and as He reveals His love for us, as we explore its breadth and width, its height and depth, the more we will be assured of this.  Assured of it, we will rest, knowing His peace.

AMEN!

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