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In My Search for Meaning, In Our Search for Truth, Have We Lost Our Minds?

Featured imageDiscussion/Devotion Thought of the Day:

2  “Everything is meaningless, says the Teacher,completely meaningless! 3  What do people get for all their hard work under the sun? 4  Generations come and generations go, but the earth never changes. 5  The sun rises and the sun sets, then hurries around to rise again. 6  The wind blows south, and then turns north. Around and around it goes, blowing in circles. 7  Rivers run into the sea, but the sea is never full. Then the water returns again to the rivers and flows out again to the sea. 8  Everything is wearisome beyond description. No matter how much we see, we are never satisfied. No matter how much we hear, we are not content. Ecclesiastes 1:2-8 (NLT)

Men are all too inclined—the great philosopher of religion opines—to wait placidly for proofs of the reality of revelation, to seek them out as if they were in the position of judge, not suppliant. “They have decided to put the Almighty to the proof—with controlled passion, a total freedom from bias, and a clear head.” But the individual who thus makes himself lord of the truth deceives himself, for truth shuns the arrogant and reveals itself only to those who approach it in an attitude of reverence, of respectful humility.  (1)

425    To realize that you love me so much, my God, and yet I haven’t lost my mind!

I am not a natural born philosopher.  Matter of fact, my “favorite” quote on Philosophy sums it up – I may be wise simply because I know I don’t know it all. ( Paraphrased of course)

I once did, well, at least I thought I did know it all.  I knew a lot back then.  No, let me rephrase that, I picked up an retained data, and found uses for it faster than some others. But knowing data is not the same things as having complete knowledge, much less being wise.

Solomon had this problem as well, at least in the early chapters.  For his wisdom and knowledge, recognized by all, still led him into discontent, a sense of failure, a sense of meaninglessness.

In the same place are all philosophers who try and hold the position of judge, as Benedict XVI points out clearly.  Philosophers must be observers of reality, to live in awe of it.  To ponder its depth, not rule over it. Solomon would eventually get there, (tomorrow in my readings perhaps?) to the point where he will define himself by his relationship with God.  But even that is a position of suppliance, of faith, of dependence.

The philosopher who approaches reality without the reverence and humility that Benedict recommends ends up in Solomon’s position, a place where we indeed lose our mind, our psyche, and perhaps, our soul.

I am not saying we are to give up on philosophy, on deep thought, on exploring, with great awe, the existence and meaning of life.  To search out what is real, what is true.  We need to do this, and St. Josemaria gives us the place to start, in realizing the love of God, for us.  That is where philosophy and theology should, no must start. In the depth of a relationship with the God who not only defines reality, but creates it. As St. Paul encourages,

18  And may you have the power to understand, as all God’s people should, how wide, how long, how high, and how deep his love is. Ephesians 3:18 (NLT)

Ratzinger, J. (1992). Co-Workers of the Truth: Meditations for Every Day of the Year. (M. F. McCarthy & L. Krauth, Trans., I. Grassl, Ed.) (pp. 166–167). San Francisco: Ignatius Press.

Escriva, Josemaria (2010-11-02). The Way (Kindle Location 1053). Scepter Publishers. Kindle Edition

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