Did they mean it? Can we?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADevotional Thought of the Day:
11 “I have spoken these things to you so that My joy may be in you and your joy may be complete. 12 This is My command: Love one another as I have loved you. 13 No one has greater love than this, that someone would lay down his life o for his friends. 14 You are My friends if you do what I command you. 15 I do not call you slaves anymore, because a slave doesn’t know what his master is doing. I have called you friends, because I have made known to you everything I have heard from My Father. 16 You did not choose Me, but I chose you. I appointed you that you should go out and produce fruit and that your fruit should remain, so that whatever you ask the Father in My name, He will give you. 17 This is what I command you: Love one another.  John 15:11-17  HCSB

It is the urgent wish of this Holy Council that the measures undertaken by the sons of the Catholic Church should develop in conjunction with those of our separated brethren so that no obstacle be put in the ways of divine Providence and no preconceived judgments impair the future inspirations of the Holy Spirit. The Council moreover professes its awareness that human powers and capacities cannot achieve this holy objective-the reconciling of all Christians in the unity of the one and only Church of Christ. It is because of this that the Council rests all its hope on the prayer of Christ for the Church, on our Father’s love for us, and on the power of the Holy Spirit. “And hope does not disappoint, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit, who has been given to us”.

During the early years of the Reformation Luther and others proposed again and again that a general council of the church be convened to discuss and arbitrate the questions of doctrine and practice that were in controversy…..

It is a hard thing tl o love people you do not know.

It is a harder thing to love those you think you know, and whom you think wish you ill, but whom you do not really know.

This doesn’t matter whether we are talking about large groups (i.e. the Catholics, Orthodox, Protestants, and Lutherans looking at each other) or whether we are talking about neighbors or “those” people.

if we are honest, each of us has people we think we understand, and whom we think we need to protect ourselves from, for we know they mean us evil.

Even so, we are called to love them, really love them.  Even to the point of death…

Surely then, if that is the length we are to go, we could try to get rid of the preconceived judgments that Vatican II warns us of, trying to put no obstacle in the way of divine providence.

We know, as St. John’s gospel pointed out, the will, the desire of God to see us one. Surely indeed we could pray for that, and learn to love each other so that it would be possible?  FOr is this not the fruit of Christ being at work in our lives?

In the title, I asked whether the Roman Catholic Church in the 1960’s meant these words in blue above.  If we ask that question, it has to be without the preconceived assumption that they do not.  (Luther’s idea of best construction)  We have to rely on God to move in that way, for it is our faith in God that

I believe many of the leaders did, they saw the need for the future.  It has taken a generation for that to trickle down to the parish level, for the people of the church to know this was even possibly a desire.  And I think, from the priests I know, that it will become more and more a desire for the church.  (The last three popes made it an issue, and I think Francis will continue that!)

Do they all? It will take time, and teaching, by both example and instruction.  But I believe it will grow.

Now the question becomes, can we mean it?  Can we, like Luther, seek our, not compromise but community?

And if I can ask that of these huge groups… can I ask it of me and that person?

The answer if found in the same place.  In the love of God, in know His will, and the providence He supplies to His people.   For as Vatican II noted,

The Council moreover professes its awareness that human powers and capacities cannot achieve this holy objective-the reconciling of all Christians in the unity of the one and only Church of Christ. It is because of this that the Council rests all its hope on the prayer of Christ for the Church, on our Father’s love for us, and on the power of the Holy Spirit.

So let us pray to the Lord of mercy. Amen!!

 

 

 

Catholic Church. “Decree on Ecumenism: Unitatis Redintegratio.” Vatican II Documents. Vatican City: Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 2011. Print.

Tappert, Theodore G., ed. The Book of Concord the Confessions of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. Philadelphia: Mühlenberg Press, 1959. Print.

About justifiedandsinner

I am a pastor of a Concordia Lutheran Church in Cerritos, California, where we rejoice in God's saving us from our sin, and the unrighteousness of the world. It is all about His work, the gift of salvation given to all who trust in Jesus Christ, and what He has done that is revealed in Scripture. God deserves all the glory, honor and praise, for He has rescued and redeemed His people.

Posted on April 13, 2018, in Augsburg and Trent, Devotions, Martin Luther, Theology in Practice, Vatican II and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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