What Causes People to Do Evil? Some defect? Some Dysfunction?

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Dawn at Concordia

Devotional thought for our days:’

9  Then he said, “You skillfully sidestep God’s law in order to hold on to your own tradition. 10  For instance, Moses gave you this law from God: ‘Honor your father and mother,’ and ‘Anyone who speaks disrespectfully of father or mother must be put to death.’ 11  But you say it is all right for people to say to their parents, ‘Sorry, I can’t help you. For I have vowed to give to God what I would have given to you.’ 12  In this way, you let them disregard their needy parents. 13  And so you cancel the word of God in order to hand down your own tradition. And this is only one example among many others.” 14  Then Jesus called to the crowd to come and hear. “All of you listen,” he said, “and try to understand. 15  It’s not what goes into your body that defiles you; you are defiled by what comes from your heart. Mark 7:9-15 (NLT)

9 We use our tongues to praise our Lord and Father, but then we curse people, whom God made like himself. 10 Praises and curses come from the same mouth! My brothers and sisters, this should not happen. James 3:9-10 NCV

79      I will not stop repeating until it is deeply engraved in your soul: Piety, piety, piety! For if you lack charity it will be for want of interior life, not for any defect of character.

As I have talked to people since the Las Vegas shooting, as I have read articles, posts and tweets about it, one question is asked over and over.  It is the same question that was asked after the Sandy Hook or Florida shootings, or the bombing in Oklahoma City, or even 9/11.

Why?

What defect is there in those who commit such horrors, what kind of evil lurks within them?  What dysfunctional part of their nature causes such evil?

And two questions follow those:

“Can we stop this from happening again?”

And the question we are afraid to ask,

“Am I capable of such evil?”

Most of us would believe we aren’t capable of that level of evil, of creating such trauma, such horror.  If you asked the Pharisees of Jesus day, they certainly didn’t believe they were capable of such evil; they were too holy.  Sure, a little sin here, a little lie there, some unforgiveness and pride, even a smattering of gossip.  But real evil?

Nah, not us.  We’re the good guys, remember?

If that isn’t our attitude, the contrary position we take, seeing every moment in our lives as proof that we make Hannibal Lector and Hitler look like simpletons when it comes to evil.  We believe our character to be broken, our dysfunctionality beyond salvation, our defects to irreparable.

We see the passage from Mark, and we know that there is something within us to cause such horror, we hear James and wonder how we can gossip or lie or brutally treat someone one moment, and sing A Mighty Fortress or say the Lord’s Prayer or the Apostles Creed the next.

Well, sin is pictured several times (including James 5) as an illness, a sickness, a disease that has weakened us. Yes, we are responsible for our thoughts, our words, our actions, but at another level, we are incapable of living life free from the bondage in which sin grips us.  It is more than just a defect or dysfunction, this sin that so easily ensnares us.

I think St Josemaria points out the answer, as he mentions our interior life.  Our struggle with sin as Christians is because we don’t understand what it means to dwell in the presence of God.  It is that interior life, that time that we spend living in Christ, resting in His presence, being transformed by the Holy Spirit that provides the love we need to love others, and to love and adore God.

This isn’t some exercise in finding God, it doesn’t take a pilgrimage around the world, though there are places where realizing He is there is easier, like in a church as they celebrate the Eucharist, or in a gathering of people singing His praises. He is with you on that sleepless night as well, or in the heat of the moment, when you want to respond in anger, or in pain.

The interior life is simply living and recognizing the presence of God, and hearing His voice.

So call out to Him, give Him your burdens, pray that He will help you, confident of His promises too….especially when it is dealing with temptation, or with the ghosts of the past.

The Lord is with you!  AMEN!

Escriva, Josemaria. The Forge (Kindle Locations 495-498). Scepter Publishers. Kindle Edition.

About justifiedandsinner

I am a pastor of a Concordia Lutheran Church in Cerritos, California, where we rejoice in God's saving us from our sin, and the unrighteousness of the world. It is all about His work, the gift of salvation given to all who trust in Jesus Christ, and what He has done that is revealed in Scripture. God deserves all the glory, honor and praise, for He has rescued and redeemed His people.

Posted on October 13, 2017, in Devotions, Poiema, st josemaria escriva, The Forge and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Outstanding!

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