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Who is Your Man? Luke 14:1-14

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Who is Your Man?
Luke 14:1-14

I.H.S.

May the grace, mercy and peace of God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ bring you comfort and peace, allowing you the chance to look around, and see others need for that comfort and peace!

Who is “this man”… for you?

As they settled down for dinner, all attention was on Jesus, the “honored” guest.

I say “honored” that way, because the Greek is clear, they were on guard, not sure about what he was going to say.  They had heard cool things about His ministry, the miracles, the crowds. But they also heard about the concerns, that people had claimed he was a blasphemer, that there had been mobs that had tried to stone him, and that many of the pharisees stood against them, perhaps even the one who invited him this night!

and off in the back, was a man no one noticed.

How he had gotten there, it doesn’t say.  The pain levels he was encountering were severe.  Whether the swollen legs were cause by heart failure, or by blood clots, or diabetes, we don’t know.  But they didn’t have water pills in those days, and his legs were many times larger than they should be.

Even still, he was there, this man that was overlooked, and not one noticed.

Except Jesus.  He did, and despite the opposition, he performed a miracle, and healed this man!

Which brings us to my sermon question for this day.

If we apply this passage to your life, who is “your” man?  Who is the person in need that you are overlooking? Who is in need? Into whose life had God drawn you, so that you could help them?

The Parable and the Man

After Jesus heals the man, he sends him off.  Then he talks to the pharisees and the experts in religion about what He had done and whether it was kosher to do it on the Sabbath. They had a paradox to work through, an ethical dilemma.  Minister to someone in need, and break man’s interpretation of God’s law, or obey God’s law and leave the man in pain and in danger of dying?

They can’t answer.

So Jesus tells the parable, and gives them direction.  We need to realize that Jesus wasn’t changing the subject, this is the same context, the same conversation.

So who is the more distinguished person Jesus advises everyone to leave the best seat for?

Looking at the text of the entire passage, I think it is the man who is hurting, the one whose body is broken.  The reason I say this is the words from verse fourteen,

Then at the resurrection of the righteous, God will reward you for inviting those who could not repay you.”

The most distinguished people in God’s way of thinking, are those in need.  Whether it is because they are physically broken, mentally broken, or spiritually broken by sin and its partners, guilt and shame, these are the people that have value in God’s mind. 

For when you care for them, you are caring for Jesus

I mentioned those broken by sin, by guilt and shame. I think we need to examine how we treat those people. I am not just talking about sinners like murderers and rapists, I am talking about those who have trouble with envy, or gossip, lust, or using God’s word in the wrong way, to curse or swear.  We can add those who don’t use God’s name to praise or pray to Him as well, or who run to other gods, like drugs or sex or work, rather than depend on God to bring healing to their brokenness.

They are the people, these people that are broken and crushed by the weight of sin, that we need to be aware of, that we need to see, that we need to serve.  They are the people that we need to invite to feast, and it was for such people that this place, this altar was put here. 

Not for people who think they have a right to them

But for those who are broken, for those who are sinners

For you and I…
.
The Gospel – for Jesus, “this man” is for you

You see, you and I can have several roles in this story. Far too often, we are like the ones who try to get the best seats in the house.  That needs to stop! We can be like Jesus, seeing those who need to see and hear and find healing.   That should be our goal, and every single one of us needs to become accustom to seeing and inviting those God is preparing, those who God would see us help. 

But before we are ready to imitate Jesus, we all need to see our role in this story as being the man with the swollen arms and legs, the man who is broken and needs healing. 

The sinner who Jesus comes to and says, “Friend, we have a better place for you!”

We have to realize that is where we start, and as you come to communion this morning, hear Jesus’s voice calling to you, bringing you here, and remember that He is healing your brokenness.

For that is why He died on the cross, to take than sin from us. That is why we united to His death and resurrection in baptism.  That is why the book of Hebrews echo’s Jesus invitation,

16  So let us come boldly to the throne of our gracious God. There we will receive his mercy, and we will find grace to help us when we need it most.
Hebrews 4:16 (NLT2)

My friends, we need to think through what He’s done, to remember this death we proclaim every time we commune, to remember the forgiveness that is ours because His blood was shed for us.

As we look around this room, and around our community, looking for these broken people God values, may we never forget He looked around, saw us broken, and invited us to dine with Him.  AMEN!

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