Don’t Shake the Dust off Your Feet….yet

Good News BibleDevotional Thought for the Day:
14  And so, my friends, as you wait for that Day, do your best to be pure and faultless in God’s sight and to be at peace with him. 15  Look on our Lord’s patience as the opportunity he is giving you to be saved, just as our dear friend Paul wrote to you, using the wisdom that God gave him.
2 Peter 3:14-15 (TEV)

206         I understand your holy impatience, but at the same time you must realise that there are some who need to think things over for a long time and others who will respond all in good time… Wait for them with open arms. Add the spice of abundant prayer and mortification to your holy impatience. They will be more youthful and generous when they come. They will have got rid of their bourgeois approach, and they will be all the more courageous. Think how God is waiting for them!

In Matthew 10:14, Jesus gives the following direction to the Twelve Apostles as they embark on their first teaching journey,

14  And if some home or town will not welcome you or listen to you, then leave that place and shake the dust off your feet. 15  I assure you that on the Judgment Day God will show more mercy to the people of Sodom and Gomorrah than to the people of that town! Matthew 10:13-15 (TEV)

I’ve heard this used a lot over the course of my ministry, in a way that is simply, sinful.  The pastor who is burnt out on ministry, and can’t seem to get his people to appreciate his vision.  The leader who, though sincere, is causing division in the church.  The family member, who has given up on a parent, or a child, or a cousin, because they are too stubborn, too obstinate, too argumentative to see their need for Christ.  Or the horrible sinners, proven by their lifestyle, or political choices, (or in their favorite sports team) who will not heed our call to repentance of the speck in their eye, while they see the petrified forest in ours.

We are tired of the pain, the anxiety, the stress, so we write off someone we care called to love, rather than embrace the call to minister to them patiently.   We use the passage from Matthew to justify our cutting off the person or people that cause us such trauma.  (often without thinking about the trauma we cause them!)

In shaking the dust off our feet, we feel vindicated, somehow more righteous or holy, and we think that God is on our side.

And we couldn’t be more wrong.

We, who have benefitted from the Lord’s patience, need to imitate that patience.  We who have come to know His love, need to love that sacrificially/  Sacrificing our pride, our self-righteousness, even the sleep we may give up, as we spend the night in prayer for these people we are called to love, and that God would sustain and heal our hearts in the process.

For being patient with them, is about realizing this isn’t a win or lose based on getting them to church tomorrow, but spending eternity with them in the presence of God. That is why St Josemaria urges us to be patient, giving those we are sent to minister to enough time to realize the love being revealed to them.  Wait for them with open arms, continually pray for them, knowing that our mission is different than the apostles, in that it wasn’t preceding Jesus to the cross.

Be patient, God is.  Be loving, for He loves you!  Be willing to sacrifice, and even suffer, for that too will prove to them the love of God who doesn’t give up on them, or on you and I.

Be patient, with the unbeliever, and the believer.

And keep on putting them in the hands of God…. for this will help, as you contemplate on how much God loves us all.

Lord, give us the heart to see people healed of their sin, to be freed from their brokenness, and the patience that only the Holy Spirit can give us, You patience, to wait and see them come to the Lord!  AMEN!

Escriva, Josemaria. Furrow (Kindle Locations 1068-1072). Scepter Publishers. Kindle Edition.

About justifiedandsinner

I am a pastor of a Concordia Lutheran Church in Cerritos, California, where we rejoice in God's saving us from our sin, and the unrighteousness of the world. It is all about His work, the gift of salvation given to all who trust in Jesus Christ, and what He has done that is revealed in Scripture. God deserves all the glory, honor and praise, for He has rescued and redeemed His people.

Posted on October 13, 2018, in Devotions, st josemaria escriva, The Furrow, Theology in Practice and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Good words, Dustin. Thanks

    • justifiedandsinner

      Rich,
      Am I write in thinking this is something we’ve lost the art of in the age of decision theology?

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