There is More to Salvation than Justification

Devotional Thought of the Day:

1  And so, dear brothers and sisters, I plead with you to give your bodies to God because of all he has done for you. Let them be a living and holy sacrifice—the kind he will find acceptable. This is truly the way to worship him. 2  Don’t copy the behavior and customs of this world, but let God transform you into a new person by changing the way you think. Then you will learn to know God’s will for you, which is good and pleasing and perfect.     Romans 12:1-2 (NLT)

4  But—“When God our Savior revealed his kindness and love, 5  he saved us, not because of the righteous things we had done, but because of his mercy. He washed away our sins, giving us a new birth and new life through the Holy Spirit. 6  He generously poured out the Spirit upon us through Jesus Christ our Savior. 7  Because of his grace he declared us righteous and gave us confidence that we will inherit eternal life.” 8  This is a trustworthy saying, and I want you to insist on these teachings so that all who trust in God will devote themselves to doing good. These teachings are good and beneficial for everyone.    Titus 3:4-8 (NLT)

Article VI: Of New Obedience Also they teach that this faith is bound to bring forth good fruits, and that it is necessary to do good works commanded by God, because of God’s will, but that we should not rely on those works to merit justification before God. For remission of sins and justification is apprehended by faith, as also the voice of Christ attests: When ye shall have done all these things, say: We are unprofitable servants. Luke 17:10. The same is also taught by the Fathers. For Ambrose says: It is ordained of God that he who believes in Christ is saved, freely receiving remission of sins, without works, by faith alone.  ( The Augsburg Confession:  The Chief Articles of the Fatih)

For all of this, I must thank Him, praise Him, serve Him and obey Him. Yes, this is true!
Martin Luther, Luther’s Small Catechism: Developed and Explained, Under: “Part Two: The Creed”.

In these days following Easter, as we move towards Pentecost, the readings in my devotionals, and the assigned readings for church describe a major shift in the lives of those who trust in God. They don’t change; they are changed.  They aren’t simply justified by faith, as if that is the end of their salvation, they are also sanctified, set apart in a holy relationship, described as the New Covenant between God and His people.

I think as a church we do a disservice.  At the time of the Reformation, Lutheran and some Reformed churches has a balance between Justification and Sanctification.  While we were absolute that nothing we do merits our salvation, that there is nothing we do to justify ourselves before God, there was a change that He did to us.

In the green and blue quotes above, from the Augsburg Confession and Luther’s Small Catechism, this change is made clear and absolute.  It is necessary to do good works,  and We must thank, praise, serve and obey Him.  There is no option allowed in those words

Change happens. Change will happen. We are not saved by faith alone as if that is all that salvation is; it is to misrepresent Luther and the rest of the evangelical Catholic reformers to indicate that is so.   They knew what would happen to us in the relationship we have with God; the New Covenant spells it out, as clearly as it spells out the assurance of Christ’s work in redeeming us.

So how does this work?  How much effort will it take to change?  How mandatory is it?

Regarding mandatory, I think Luther and Melanchthon and the words necessary and must make it clear from Lutheran theology.  The quote from ROmans 12,  Paul pleads with people to let God work this our lives, just to give ourselves into His hands (which is where we belong anyway!) and let the Spirit mold us, working through us.

Paul will also tell Timothy to keep teaching about God’s work transforming us, and the Spirit overwhelming us, for that will result in our devoting ourselves to doing good.  That is the key to this, our grasping, not just with our mind but with heart, sou, mind and strength what it means to be in Christ, to have the Spirit dwell within us.

As we pray, as we learn, as God reveals Himself to us, in us, He transforms us.  We become His masterpiece, a divine work of art.  This is the promise God makes to us in His word.

So it makes no sense to argue about works or to call those who teach what God is doing pietists.  Some need to be corrected gently, that they realize the change is made in us, rather than we make the change.  Often we aren’t even aware of it, as the sheep in Matthew 25 were unaware when they ministered to Jesus.  Love and ministry become more natural, more of what needs to be done.  The sacraments become dearer, these active, covenant renewal moments, when the grace of God promised is delivered, whetting our appetite for the feast when all become completely transformed when all are welcomed home into the presence of our Father.

Look to Jesus the author and finisher of our faith, look to Him as the Holy Spirit transforms you from glory to glory, Look to Him, know HIs love, hear His promises, and let His word direct your thoughts words and actions.  And if you fall, confess it, let His absolving cleanse your heart, and continue to journey with the God, who loves you.

AMEN

 

 

About justifiedandsinner

I am a pastor of a Concordia Lutheran Church in Cerritos, California, where we rejoice in God’s saving us from our sin, and the unrighteousness of the world. It is all about His work, the gift of salvation given to all who trust in Jesus Christ, and what He has done that is revealed in Scripture. God deserves all the glory, honor and praise, for He has rescued and redeemed His people.

Posted on April 5, 2016, in Devotions and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Well said Dustin. Great reminder. In these kind of discussions I just cant get away from 2 Peter 1: 3-11.

  2. Indeed, the transformation that is repentance is something that does happen. Yet we have people saying you must change before the Spirit would work, and others saying you will never change….

    It’s as if Romans 6:11 wasn’t written… or Paul didn’t ask us to imitate him where he imitated Jesus, or Jesus didn’t say, be holy. It all starts in covenant with Him… but it still starts.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: